International Women’s Day

Mar 08, 2013 Comments Off by

IWD 101 years

International Women’s Day has been observed since the early 1900′s, a time of great expansion and turbulence in the industrialized world that saw booming population growth and the rise of radical ideologies.

This day marks a 101 official years of struggles, social change, achievements and innovation engendered by women from every corner of the globe.

History of International Women’s Day

1908 … Great unrest and critical debate was occurring amongst women. Women’s oppression and inequality was spurring women to become more vocal and active in campaigning for change.
Then in 1908, 15,000 women marched through New York City demanding shorter hours, better pay and voting rights.
1909 … In accordance with a declaration by the Socialist Party of America, the first National Woman’s Day (NWD) was observed across the United States on 28 February. Women continued to celebrate NWD on the last Sunday of February until 1913.
1910 … In 1910 a second International Conference of Working Women was held in Copenhagen. A woman named a Clara Zetkin (Leader of the ‘Women’s Office’ for the Social Democratic Party in Germany) tabled the idea of an International Women’s Day
1911 … International Women’s Day (IWD) was honoured for the first time in Austria, Denmark, Germany and Switzerland on 19 March after a consensus in Copenhagen in 1911.
Over one million women and men attended IWD rallies campaigning for women’s rights to work, vote, be trained, to hold public office and end discrimination.
However less than a week later on 25 March, the tragic ‘Triangle Fire’ in New York City took the lives of more than 140 working women, most of them Italian and Jewish immigrants. This disaster drew significant attention to working conditions and labour legislation in the United States that became a focus of subsequent International Women’s Day events.

Events, History, Innovation, Lifestyle

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